U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board recently released its TTAB filing statistics for fiscal year 2018.   These updated figures include year-to-year changes in the filing of appeals, notices of oppositions, and petitions for cancellations.  It also provides useful information on the disposition of cases.

Highlights include the following:  (percentage in parentheses signifies change over 2017)

Trademark image

Prevailing in a TTAB opposition proceeding against a food and beverage company proves to be sweet for the makers of Nutella.

In Ferrero S.p.A. v. Ruchi Soya Industries Limited,  Ferrero, who is the owner of the NUTELLA spread brand, opposed Applicant’s mark NUTRELA for a wide variety of food and beverage products in International

Trademark opposition proceedings are civil litigations before the U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB).  Companies that wish to enforce their trademark rights through TTAB proceedings should take into account the following pre-filing considerations:

  1.  Standing. Standing is a procedural requirement for all potential opposers.  To establish standing to bring or maintain a trademark opposition,

Trademark cancellation proceedings based on abandonment continue to present challenges to trademark registrants.   In the latest case before the US Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, however, the registrant’s trademark registration was spared.

In AD5 Inc. v. Jennifer M. Estes dba #SELFiE T’s, the Petitioner sought to cancel Reg. No. 4642072 of the Registrants #SELFIE

The U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board has disclosed first and second quarter filing and pendency statistics for 2018.   Year to date (YTD) statistics as compared to the same period in 2017 include the following:

U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board filings

  • extensions of time to oppose:  9,498  (+2.7% YTD)
  • trademark oppositions: 3,211 (+4.3% YTD)

Many trademark attorneys believe that the goal of a TTAB discovery conference is to zealously prepare for litigation.  A better approach is to view it through the lens of a favorable settlement outcome.  Since over 90% of trademark oppositions settle prior to trial, it makes sense to do so.

According to U.S. Trademark Trial and

When it comes to trademark oppositions, it pays to be Kühl.

In Alfwear Inc. v. Shuff, the U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board was asked to consider whether the Applicant’s KU:L and design trademark for bicycles in International Class 12 created a likelihood of confusion with Opposer’s asserted “family” of KUHL trademarks for inter alia